Affiliate Area

Welcome to the affiliate area. Here is all the content for you to use. Please download any banners you want and make sure you use YOUR AFFILIATE LINK.

If you need help setting up your affiliate account please contact me info@theherbalhub.com or give me a ring if you need to (Ireland 086 8899168).

Hi there,

Thanks for helping to get the word out there about my online course ‘Learn with the Seasons’. I truly am passionate about teaching people and genuinely believe that it is everyone’s birthright to be able to recognise and use some of the edible and medicinal plants that grow where they live. I created this online course to provide on-going learning and support for people in a flexible and in-depth way. Learning these skills benefits health in so many ways: the health of people, the health of wildlife and the health of the planet. So let’s get this info out there now! We all need it.

The Autumn course is now in season. I’ve created a plan to help you to tell your audience about it. There are several email templates and photos which you can copy and paste as they are or edit (if you’re going to edit the emails then be sure not to change the key info that I’ve written about the properties of the plants because it’s vital that this is accurate; but by all means adapt the email to make it more suitable to your style/audience). You do not need to send all the emails but, in my experience I recommend that the least you send is one initial introductory email and then a reminder one on the day of the enrolment deadline.

USE ANY OF THESE FOLLOWING BANNERS ON YOUR WEBSITE WITH YOUR AFFILIATE LINK OR IN YOUR EMAILS!

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DON’T FORGET…..

  1. Change EVERY link in the email template with YOUR AFFILIATE LINK!
  2. If we are arranging any special bonuses together for this event then tell your list about them in the email as well!!!! This will help you get more sales!

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EMAILS

EMAIL 1

SUBJECT CHOICES:

  • Autumn is the perfect time to forage!
  • Start to discover edible & medicinal wild plants & herbs
Hi [NAME]

It’s Autumn already and it’s a wonderful time of year for foraging for edible & medicinal plants. I know this great online course by Vivienne Campbell, who is a qualified herbalist & experienced forager. She’s been teaching classes in Ireland for 12 years and has appeared many times on national television showing these skills. Now she teaches students world-wide via her online course which is packed full of videos teaching you how to safely identify herbs and how to use them to make medicinal herbal extracts or cook them as nourishing wild foods.

At this time of year roots, fruits, hips, nuts and seeds and can all be collected. There is so much to choose from : Delicious and immune-boosting elderberries and rosehips; whizz up a pesto from sorrel & hazelnuts; dig up some roots and roast some dandelion coffee; or go really fancy and save some seed from red clover and sprout them in to nutritious bean sprouts (if you have the patience!).

It’s a wonderful time to make syrups, vinegars, preserves and cordials; or simply to dry herbs for use later in the year.

The Autumn online course is currently in season and now is a perfect time to begin to learn about the wild herbs that grow around you. There are lessons and videos on many medicinal and edible plants showing you how to identify them and use them as nutritious wild foods or make safe and effective herbal remedies from them. This course includes: sea buckthorn, rosehips, elderberries, hazelnuts, dock roots, dandelion roots, plantain seeds, blackberries, Guelder rose (cramp bark) and much more!

Vivienne is truly passionate about teaching people how to use the edible & medicinal plants that grow around them. She genuinely believes that it’s everyone’s birth-right to have this info and these skills. She created this course to be really useful and flexible: no deadlines or home-work; simply login and watch the videos and read the lessons whenever it suits you. You get life-time access so there’s no need to rush (the plants grow back every year anyway!) and you also get the chance to ask Vivienne your questions during live webinars. Just start to learn: it’s wonderful and life-enhancing and once you’ve learnt these skills you’ll have them forever.

Not sure if online learning is for you? Vivienne offers a money-back guarantee. If you enrol in the course but it’s not your thing then simple email her within 7 days and she’ll refund your money, no questions asked.

To read more and/or join this course now, click here. [ADD YOUR AFFILATE LINK HERE]

All the best with your foraging
[PUT YOUR NAME HERE]

 

 

EMAIL 2

SUBJECT LINE OPTIONS:

  • Did you know that cities are a great place to forage?
  • Wild food foraging in urban places

Hi [NAME],

[‘The Edible City by John Rensten]

You might think that foraging for edible and medicinal herbs is something that can only be done by people who live in the countryside. However, you’d be surprised how easy it can be to find rich foraging sources in towns and cities. Many trees have edible and medicinal parts and are common in urban places: just think of beautiful lime tree (Tilia europa) avenues. The flowers of these trees usually blossom around mid-summer. The scent is heavenly and bees adore them! The flowers make a beautiful tea that has many medicinal properties (including helping to lower blood pressure) and in France it is a traditional digestive drink taken after meals.

Autumn is also a great time to look for medicinal plants where you live. Try looking around the city and see if you can spot an elder tree. Elders are common trees and shrubs often found in gardens (if your local pub has a beer garden then have a look there!) and in parks. At this time of year they produce the wonderful elder berry which is a fantastic immune-tonic and helps to fight viruses. Elderberries are also absolutely delicious when made in to a cordial with cloves, ginger and other goodies.

Learn with the Seasons is an online course written and supported by Vivienne Campbell (qualified herbalist and foraging teacher). It contains dozens of videos showing you how to identify and use local medicinal and edible plants and turn them in to nourishing dishes or delicious medicinal herbal tonics. It’s a great way to learn because if you forget something then all you need to do is watch the videos again which is really convenient. And it’s supported too: students get the chance to ask Vivienne their questions during live webinars. John Rensten (author of The Edible City) will also give a guest webinar so if you’re a city-dweller who wants to start foraging then this one is for you! Online learning is a great way to learn these skills and build your confidence so that you can go out and do this yourself. There isn’t any home-work or deadlines: students get life-time access to the course so you can simply learn at your leisure for your pleasure and knowledge.

To read more and/or join this course now, click here. [ADD YOUR AFFILATE LINK HERE]

Ripe elderberries

[A big bag of foraged elder berries]

All the best with your foraging
[PUT YOUR NAME HERE]

 

 

My offer ends:

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EMAIL 3

SUBJECT CHOICES:

  • An usual use for red clover
  • Make your own bean sprouts from a common local plant
  • A little-known use for a common wild food
  • Red clover: a medicinal herb and a nutritious wild food
Hi [NAME]

If you know a little about medicinal herbs then you’ve probably already heard about red clover. It is rich in phyto-oestrogens and so is often given to ladies to try to help to improve fertility or to help to reduce some of the symptoms in menopause.  It also helps the functioning of the lymphatic system so is often used to ease sore throats, tonsillitis and swollen glands.

Red Clover

[A red clover flower]

However, what you might not also realise is that it’s also a tasty and nutritious wild food. It’s in the bean family so it’s rich in protein. Earlier in the year you can pick the flowers and eat them (they have a lovely sweet taste) but in the autumn you can harvest the seeds from the plant and sprout them in to bean sprouts. They are tasty and like all bean sprouts, they contain protein. Add them to salads or cook them in stir-fries.

If you’d like to learn this technique then check out the Autumn edition of Learn With The Seasons, an e-course teaching people how to forage for and use local edible & medicinal wild plants. It contains loads of videos and photo lessons showing you how to use local plants as foods and medicines. This course is written and supported by Vivienne Campbell (qualified herbalist and foraging teacher). Students get the chance to ask her their questions during live webinars, so it really is a great way to learn these skills and build your confidence so that you can go out and do this yourself.

To read more and/or join this course now, click here. [ADD YOUR AFFILATE LINK HERE]

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[Rinsing red clover seeds to sprout them]

All the best with your foraging
[PUT YOUR NAME HERE]

EMAIL 4

SUBJECT CHOICES:

  • Children love foraging!
  • A healthy activity for the whole family
  • Transform a ‘boring’ walk in to a foraging adventure
  • Make delicious herbal remedies with your children
Hi [NAME]
 Girl with dandelion

Children love foraging for plants and cooking them or making remedies from them. It comes very naturally to them. Learning to recognise and use some of the local edible and medicinal plants that grow where you live can be a great family activity. It’s an excellent way to get kids out on a walk and prevent them for complaining that it’s ‘boring’!! Instead, show them the plant that you want to collect and set them off to go and find it. Who can collect the most blackberries, elderberries or hazelnuts? Kids love a challenge like this. Get out there to collect the plants and then get back in to the kitchen and make the remedies together!

At this time of year there are lots of local plants that can be collected to make delicious herbal tonics which help to boost immunity, fight viruses and ease colds, flu and coughs. Stick to something easy to recognise. You might not be confident at identifying immune-boosting plants such as elderberry or rosehips (and it’s vital that before using any wild plant your must be 100% confident of the identification) BUT most people are very familiar with blackberries and these can be used to make an excellent tonic to help to relieve colds and sore throats. And it’s delicious too so you are unlikely to have any resistance to taking it. Children are far more likely to take their medicine when they are ill, if they have helped to make it in the first place. In fact, I’ve even heard children who say “Mum, is it time for my medicine again yet?” No need for a spoonful of sugar to help the medicine go down in this case.

This course is written and supported by Vivienne Campbell (qualified herbalist and foraging teacher). The Autumn edition of the course is in season now and has lessons on many tasty medicinal and edible plants that can be easily found and used at this time of year e.g. blackberries, elderberries, rosehips, sea buckthorn, dock, hazel, dandelion etc. The course has videos showing how to identify and use local plants. Students get the chance to ask Vivienne their questions during live webinars, so it really is a great way to learn these skills and build your confidence so that you can go out and do this yourself. To read more/enrol click here:

 To read more and/or join this course now, click here. [ADD YOUR AFFILATE LINK HERE]

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[Photo: Making elderberry cordial]

All the best with your foraging
[PUT YOUR NAME HERE]

EMAIL 5

SUBJECT CHOICES:

  • Rosehips: food and medicine
  • Discover how to recognise and use local rosehips
  • An local plant that’s a powerful immune-booster
  • A local plant that’s rich in vitamin C
  • A delicious, immune-boosting tonic!
[Photo: wild rose hips]
Hi [NAME]
Just as we head in to winter and we face the cold & sniffle season, nature provides us with rose hips. Wonderful immune-boosting, vitamin – rich, tasty tonics. They can be made in to a medicinal cordial, an infused vinegar or even cooked in to a nourishing dessert.  Yes they are a bit fiddly but yes they are worth it. Part of the pleasure of foraging is the annual ritual of gathering plants and making batches of favourite medicines or foods. It can be a really enjoyable activity that the whole family can look forward to and help with (a bit like making home-made puddings or mince-meat in preparation for Christmas). Why spend money in shops buying expensive immune-boosting products that have often been imported from the other side of the world (yes, I’m talking about you ‘manuka honey’!) when we have wonderful plants right here on our doorstep that can do the same job?
Learn to use the plants that surround you and change the way that you see the landscape forever. The Autumn e-course is in season now and contains lessons about rosehips, elderberries and sea buckthorn: 3 local plants that are famous immune-boosters and are also really tasty. There are loads of lessons about other edible & medicinal autumn plants too. This course is written and supported by Vivienne Campbell (qualified herbalist and foraging teacher). Students get the chance to ask her their questions during live webinars, so it really is a great way to learn these skills and build your confidence so that you can go out and do this yourself. To read more/enrol click here:

 

Learn with the Seasons is an online course written and supported by Vivienne Campbell (qualified herbalist and foraging teacher). It contains dozens of videos showing you how to identify and use local medicinal and edible plants and turn them in to nourishing dishes or delicious medicinal herbal tonics. It’s a great way to learn because if you forget something then all you need to do is watch the videos again. It’s really convenient. And it’s supported too: students get the chance to ask Vivienne their questions during live webinars. It really is a great way to learn these skills and build your confidence so that you can go out and do this yourself. There isn’t any home-work or deadlines: students get life-time access to the course so you can simply learn at your leisure for your pleasure and knowledge.

 

To read more and/or join this course now, click here. [ADD YOUR AFFILATE LINK HERE]

herbal medicne autumn foraging

[Photo: various rosehips]

All the best with your foraging
[PUT YOUR NAME HERE]

EMAIL 6

SUBJECT CHOICES:

  • Make your own pesto from foraged local plants
  • A local alterative to pine nuts & basil
  • Do you know how to recognise hazlenuts?
  • Impress your friends with your own local pesto
  • An activity to transform a walk in to a foraging adventure
Hi [NAME]
 Ripe hazelnuts on the tree
[A cluster of hazelnuts on a hazel tree]

Pesto has become a popular house-hold staple and rightly-so. It’s very tasty and versatile in cooking e.g. on pasta, as a baked potato filling, in a salad dressing etc. We’re all familiar with the standard shop-bought pesto made from basil, cheese and pine nuts but there are many local wild food versions that you can whizz up for a change and they are very easy to make (and it also gives you the added bonus of feeling virtuous because you’re significantly reducing food miles by using local ingredients on your doorstep instead of ingredients have travelled from around the world!). Even if you’re new to foraging, then you’ll probably have heard of the spring-time treat wild garlic pesto but in the autumn a really tasty and very different pesto can be made from hazelnuts and sorrel. Fresh sorrel is usually available from Spring – Autumn. And hazel trees grow in many parts of Ireland and the UK. They produce lots of hazelnuts (you’ll just need to race the squirrels to them).  Gathering the nuts is usually easy. Getting in to them through the shells is great fun: wrap them in a tea towel and bash them with a hammer. Who wouldn’t enjoy that?!

The Autumn edition of Learn with the Seasons is currently in season. For those of you who are really keen to learn about wild foods it contains some well-known foraged recipes e.g. dandelion coffee, rosehip syrup, pesto etc. but also some more unusual ones e.g. cooked silverweed roots (a nourishing staple food before the potato was imported from America), hawthorn chutney, sea buckthorn juice and bean sprouts made from red clover. This course is written and supported by Vivienne Campbell (qualified herbalist and foraging teacher). Students get the chance to ask her their questions during live webinars, so it really is a great way to learn these skills and build your confidence so that you can go out and do this yourself.

 

To read more and/or join this course now, click here. [ADD YOUR AFFILATE LINK HERE]

[Hazelnut & sorrel pesto]

 

All the best with your foraging
[PUT YOUR NAME HERE]